Archive for the ‘ Garden Photography ’ Category

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Team at MyGardenSchool

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Top Ten Garden Tasks for Autumn


The Abbey Gardens, Dorchester

1. Tidy up!

Autumn is a great time for those who love wielding the clippers – all that summer growth will need a trim back now to keep the garden tidy. But many off-cuts will strike well in the humidity right now so think about planting some of your cuttings out into pots.

2. Dig out the debris

Remove plant debris and diseased leaves from flowers and vegetable patches. Dig up the annuals – plants that last only a season – and put them on the compost heap. Flowering perennials – plants that spring up year after year from their roots – should be cut back. Remove yellowing or dead leaves or flowers before rot develops and remove any weeds hidden under the plant foliage.

3. Start composting

Winter gives cuttings and leaves a chance to break down and produce nutrient-rich compost, which will be ready for boosting the garden in the new year. Now is also a really good time to turn your compost heap. It will heat up nicely and then gently rot over winter.

4. Embrace autumn colour

Deciduous trees, such as acers, will provide lovely autumn colours from foliage, bark and berries. Autumn flowers such as crocus and amaryllis add colour, too. Cyclamens come in white and a range of pink shades with glossy green leaves, and add a welcome dash of vibrancy.

5. Plant for the future

This is a good time of year to plant spring bulbs, such as daffodils and tulips, and new perennials – the soil is still warm but moisture levels are increasing. There is still time for plants to establish themselves before the real cold sets in. This is also a good time of year to plant or move shrubs and trees to allow them to anchor down before the growing season. Reflect on what was and was not successful in this year’s planting scheme so that you can adapt your plans for next year.

6. Venture into the interior

Ventilate conservatories during the remaining warmer days to prevent soaring temperatures, but reduce ventilation once the cooler, windy autumn weather sets in. Use shading paint or blinds to help to keep them cool. However, as light levels fall, reduce the shading as well as the watering of any houseplants.

7. Love your lawn

For a lovely lawn next spring, start to mow less frequently and raise the height of the grass as the growth rate slows down. Scarify your lawn by raking out dead grass and moss that has built up over the summer. Follow this with applying an high-potassium autumn lawn feed, which will release the correct balance of nutrients throughout the winter.

8. Cover up the furniture

When there is no more need for garden furniture, store it in the shed or garage to protect it from the winter weather and allow it to dry out. If you can’t do this, cover it with a tough waterproof sheet securely fixed down, taking care to allow plenty of air to circulate so that the furniture is not damp all winter. Wooden items, such as benches or pergolas, may benefit from a treatment of chemical preservative.

9. Give wildlife a hand

Encourage birds into the garden by providing extra food. Place the feeder near a tall shrub, fence or mature tree to provide protection from predators. Plant berry-bearing plants for an extra source of food for birds and other wildlife. Firethorn, rowan and holly plants are recommended.

10. Protect your pond

Cover your pond with a net to stop falling leaves polluting the water, but make sure you clean it regularly to prevent the net from sinking into the pond. If it contains fish ensure that they can continue to breathe by preventing the water from freezing. Make sure the pond is at least 8ft deep because fish live in the deepest levels during the winter months.

MyGardenSchool’s Community of Gardening Photographers is Sprouting!


We’re delighted that MyGardenSchool’s Flickr group is going from strength to strength – now featuring over 100 original gardening related photographs. Some beautiful and thoughtful garden photographs are being posted, and new members joining every day thanks to word of mouth from our thriving flickr community.

If you’re interested in joining our group every gardening enthusiast is welcome – we like to award photos that we think are special in some way with the MyGardenSchool photo award. We particularly value originality and humour, as well as classically good looking photos (personality does count!).

Here’s a selection of the latest photos from MyGardenSchool’s members:

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more about “MyGardenSchool group pool“, posted with vodpod

Happy Snapping and Gardening!

The meanings of different coloured roses on Valentines Day


The meanings of different coloured roses on Valentines Day

Roses are the traditional gift given on Valentines Day, although they’re certain to be well-received any time of year. But before you buy roses, know what message you’re sending.  The colour of a rose can have a very different meaning from what you intend. To ensure that your loved one understands what the roses you bestow mean, check this guide to rose colours and their meanings:

Red Roses
Red roses proclaim “I love you.” They are the ultimate symbol of romantic love and enduring passion. Florists can’t keep up with Valentines Day demand for red roses, which makes them especially expensive in February.

Yellow Roses
Yellow roses indicate friendship and freedom — so don’t send them if your intentions are romantic and long-lasting. Yellow roses are also appropriate for sending congratulations to newlyweds, graduates, Texans, Indian Restaurants and grandmas.

Pale Pink Roses
Pale pink roses connote grace, gentleness, and gratitude.

Light Pink Roses
A joy to behold, light pink roses express fun and happiness.

Deep Pink Roses
Deep pink roses say “Thank you.” They have also come to be associated with the fight against breast cancer.

Lilac Roses
Lilac roses indicate the sender has fallen in love at first sight with the recipient and is enchanted.

White Roses
Pure white roses symbolize truth and innocence. They also send other messages: “I miss you” and “You’re heavenly.”

Peach Roses
Peach roses speak of appreciation and gratitude.  Although some peach roses I find a bit much.  And they remind me of 1970s puddings like Instant Whip and Angel Delight.  Luckily not everyone feels like me.

Coral Roses
Coral roses express one thing with their passionate color: Desire.  (Or that the garage had run out of red ones)

Orange Roses
Orange roses communicate enthusiasm and desire on the part of the sender.

Dead Roses
Regardless of the original color, dead roses say “It’s over” loud and clear.

COMBINED ROSES
Put two or more colors of roses together, and a new rose meaning arises:

White Roses + Yellow Roses
A symbol of harmony.

Red Roses + Yellow Roses
A message of happiness and celebration.

Red Roses + White Roses
An indication of bonding and harmony.

MORE ROSE SYMBOLISM
While roses are traditionally presented in bouquet form, these are also acceptable:

Single Red Rose
“I love you” (but I’m not going to go broke telling you).

Single Rose Any Color
“I thank you” (and I’m still not going to go broke saying so).

Two Roses Entwined
An engagement or marriage is imminent.

Gardening is a way of showing that you believe in tomorrow…


Gardening is a way of showing you believe in tomorrow

Gardening is a way of showing that you believe in tomorrow…

How true!  We love this photo – by Mariana, one of our MyGardenSchool Flickr group members .  I don’t think it needs explanation – just enjoy. Mariana is a freelance graphic artist/designer, turned addict to photographing anything and turning it into something…

More on Mariana

MyGardenSchool Group on Flickr


Feel free to join MyGardenSchool Group on Flickr

We like Flickr.  And embrace its passionate community of photographic enthusiasts.  Please feel free to join the MyGardenSchool Flickr group where you can get constructive comments on your plant, flower, garden and anything garden related photography.  We will begin an awards process shortly for those photographs we think are extra special.

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more about “MyGardenSchool group pool“, posted with vodpod