Archive for the ‘ Bulbs ’ Category

Our Blog Has Moved to www.my-garden-school/news. Thanks for reading!


http://www.my-garden-school.com/news

Thanks for reading

Team at MyGardenSchool

Advertisements

Top Ten Garden Tasks for Autumn


The Abbey Gardens, Dorchester

1. Tidy up!

Autumn is a great time for those who love wielding the clippers – all that summer growth will need a trim back now to keep the garden tidy. But many off-cuts will strike well in the humidity right now so think about planting some of your cuttings out into pots.

2. Dig out the debris

Remove plant debris and diseased leaves from flowers and vegetable patches. Dig up the annuals – plants that last only a season – and put them on the compost heap. Flowering perennials – plants that spring up year after year from their roots – should be cut back. Remove yellowing or dead leaves or flowers before rot develops and remove any weeds hidden under the plant foliage.

3. Start composting

Winter gives cuttings and leaves a chance to break down and produce nutrient-rich compost, which will be ready for boosting the garden in the new year. Now is also a really good time to turn your compost heap. It will heat up nicely and then gently rot over winter.

4. Embrace autumn colour

Deciduous trees, such as acers, will provide lovely autumn colours from foliage, bark and berries. Autumn flowers such as crocus and amaryllis add colour, too. Cyclamens come in white and a range of pink shades with glossy green leaves, and add a welcome dash of vibrancy.

5. Plant for the future

This is a good time of year to plant spring bulbs, such as daffodils and tulips, and new perennials – the soil is still warm but moisture levels are increasing. There is still time for plants to establish themselves before the real cold sets in. This is also a good time of year to plant or move shrubs and trees to allow them to anchor down before the growing season. Reflect on what was and was not successful in this year’s planting scheme so that you can adapt your plans for next year.

6. Venture into the interior

Ventilate conservatories during the remaining warmer days to prevent soaring temperatures, but reduce ventilation once the cooler, windy autumn weather sets in. Use shading paint or blinds to help to keep them cool. However, as light levels fall, reduce the shading as well as the watering of any houseplants.

7. Love your lawn

For a lovely lawn next spring, start to mow less frequently and raise the height of the grass as the growth rate slows down. Scarify your lawn by raking out dead grass and moss that has built up over the summer. Follow this with applying an high-potassium autumn lawn feed, which will release the correct balance of nutrients throughout the winter.

8. Cover up the furniture

When there is no more need for garden furniture, store it in the shed or garage to protect it from the winter weather and allow it to dry out. If you can’t do this, cover it with a tough waterproof sheet securely fixed down, taking care to allow plenty of air to circulate so that the furniture is not damp all winter. Wooden items, such as benches or pergolas, may benefit from a treatment of chemical preservative.

9. Give wildlife a hand

Encourage birds into the garden by providing extra food. Place the feeder near a tall shrub, fence or mature tree to provide protection from predators. Plant berry-bearing plants for an extra source of food for birds and other wildlife. Firethorn, rowan and holly plants are recommended.

10. Protect your pond

Cover your pond with a net to stop falling leaves polluting the water, but make sure you clean it regularly to prevent the net from sinking into the pond. If it contains fish ensure that they can continue to breathe by preventing the water from freezing. Make sure the pond is at least 8ft deep because fish live in the deepest levels during the winter months.

Spring! Time to go out & visit gardens – Waterperry, Oxfordshire


I first went to Waterperry two years ago – when I was desperate for Spring! Here’s a little video I made, inspired by the rising saps, fiery tulips and and unfurling ferns.. Waterperry is at its best when plants are starting to come to life from about now through to late Spring.

A day out at Waterperry Gardens near Oxford is guaranteed to delight and inspire garden-lovers from across the country and the world. Founded by Beatrix Havergal more than seventy years ago as a School of Horticulture for Ladies, the gardens at Waterperry have evolved into an oasis of calm and beauty in the heart of the Oxfordshire countryside within easy driving distance of Buckinghamshire and Berkshire.

Vodpod videos no longer available.

more about “The Gardens at Waterperry, Oxfordshire“, posted with vodpod

What to do in the Garden in Feb – Last chance to plant garlic!


Get planting your garlic! It’s your very last chance to plant garlic.  This is because garlic needs 30 nights below 10°C to trigger growth – any less and you-ll probably end up eating it as an undeveloped bulb.

Some garlics we like for late plantng:

  • Printanor This is called wet or green garlic (it looks more like an onion), and actually has a lovely mild flavour, which is delicious in soups.
  • Spanish Roja Hardneck (Rocambole) This variety is closest to wild garlic and naturally forms a seed stalk or scape which curls into a characteristic loop.
  • Thermidrome produces ivory white cloves of garlic in summer.  The bulbs are ready when the leaves begin to turn yellow.
  • Wight Cristo English production of pure white bulbs with an elegant bouquet, ideal for a wide range of dishes. Long keeping bulbs