Posts Tagged ‘ Oxford College of Garden Design ’

MyGardenSchool’s Flickr Group. Reaches 300 Members! & Now streaming to website: http://www.my-garden-school.com


We’re delighted that MyGardenSchool’s Flickr group is going from strength to strength – with 300 members and now featuring over 1000 original gardening related photographs.  As a celebration of your garden photographic talent – we are now streaming the MyGardenSchool’s Flickr group flickr page to our holding page at My-Garden-School.com Some beautiful and thoughtful garden photographs are being posted, and new members joining every day thanks to word of mouth from our thriving flickr community.

If you’re interested in joining our group every gardening enthusiast is welcome – we like to award photos that we think are special in some way with the MyGardenSchool photo award. We particularly value originality and humour, as well as classically good looking photos (personality does count!).

Here’s a selection of the latest photos from MyGardenSchool’s members:

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more about “MyGardenSchool group pool“, posted with vodpod

Happy Snapping and Gardening!

If you are interested in what we’re doing with MyGardenSchool – please feel free to register with our holding page to receive updates:

A Magic Moss Garden


A beautiful bowl of moss.  But how is it surviving in this hot weather?

Well it’s surviving because it’s Scleranthus not moss!  A beautiful green substitute that looks great spilling over in tubs or bowls.

Scleranthus is a small genus in the Caryophyllaceae family, a family that includes the exotic Carnations. Of the ten known species of Scleranthus, four are endemic to eastern Australia, the remainder native to Europe, Africa and Asia.


Scleranthus biflorus
is widely distributed in Tasmania, Victoria, New South Wales, the Australian Capital Territory, Queensland and New Zealand, from the coast to alpine areas.

distribution map


It’s Bedtime!


The trouble with bedding plants is they can look a bit municipal.  Like a 1970s roundabout.  Even the term conjures up visions of scary rows of marigolds or petunias.  But if you pick carefully and consider your colour scheme – bedding can be as beautiful as you want it to be.

Bedding plants are really all plants that, irrespective of their growing habits, are used to make a temporary show. For example: hardy bulbs (hyacinths and tulips), hardy and half-hardy perennials (chrysanthemums), and even tender shrubs (castor oil plant).

But ‘bedding’ is usually taken to mean those half-hardy annuals or half-hardy perennials planted out to make a splash of colour in the summer. For example; petunias, begonias, pelargoniums and calceolarias

In fact it’s not the plants themselves that are necessarily garish looking or uncomfortable.  But it’s their context and usage.  All too often they remind us of roundabouts or suburbia but they don’t have to.  The planting combination is key to making bedding beautiful.  And also consider some of the more interesting varieties.

Below:  Ricinus communis ‘Carmencita’ with Dahlias, Helichrysum petiolare and Miscanthus sinensis ‘Variegatus’ in August

Could our Lawns, be costing the Earth?


Suburbia

When is a lawn not green? when it's costing the earth to maintain

Lawns are becoming less and less environmentally friendly.  With increased irrigation costs and petrol prices going through the roof, how long can we afford to keep our lawns green?

If you took all the lawns in the US, they would cover the entire state of Mississippi

800 million gallons of fuel are used in the US per year to cut lawns which equates to 5% of the US’s total CO2 omissions, because lawn mowers are so inefficient!

2.5% of that 800 million gallons of fuel is spilt while trying to fill the lawn mower tanks, which is equivalent to one Exxon Valdez oil spill per year.

Statistics taken from a lecture from MIT given by Alex MacLean in March 2006

The MyGardenSchool Flickr Group Scores a Century!


We’re celebrating that the MyGardenSchool Flickr Group has now hit over 100 members! And 100s of unique gardening photographs – each telling their own gardening story. Have a browse below and take time out to meander through our members’ gardens..Happy Snapping and Gardening!

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Daily Telegraph Top 10 Hellebore Days Out


Top 10 hellebore days out

These subtle but stunning plants will be flowering soon.

Helleborus

Was Helleborus – as some historians believe – the plant on which the 33 year old Alexander the Great fatally overdosed in Babylon in 323 BCE?  We’ll probably never know!  But we love these understated beauties.  Check out this great list of Hellebore Days Out courtesy of The Daily Telegraph

Weather alert: Check all info before leaving home as some events may have been affected by weather conditions.

The Hardy Plant Society, Kent Hellebore extravaganza, Feb 15, 11am to 4pm, Goodnestone Park Gardens, Wingham. Talk on hellebores at 12.30pm by Tim Ingram (ticket only). Specialist nursery displays and sales of winter-flowering plants. Adults £5, seniors £4.50, under-16s £1 www.hpskent.co.uk).

Bosvigo, Cornwall Special hellebore day, Feb 14, 10am-4pm, Bosvigo House, Truro, in aid of Shelterbox. Newly created woodland walk through drifts of snowdrops, hellebores, wood anemones, epimediums, erythroniums and scented narcissus. Refreshments available (01872 275774; www.bosvigo.com).

Ashwood Nurseries, West Midlands Hellebore weekends, Jan 31 & Feb 1, Feb 14 & 15, 10.15am to 3.30pm, Ashwood nursery, Kingswinford. Guided tours (1h 30m), no need to book, go ”behind the scenes” and learn about the hellebore breeding programme. Entry £2, proceeds to charity (01384 401996; www.ashwood-nurseries.co.uk).

Harveys Garden Plants, Suffolk Hellebore open days, Feb 20 & 21, 9.30am to 4.30pm, Harveys Garden Plants, Bury St Edmunds. More than 1,000 hellebores for sale each day, advice and practical demonstrations, guided tours at 11.30am, 1.30pm and 3.30pm. Free. (01359 233363; www.harveysgardenplants.co.uk).

Coton Manor Garden, Northamptonshire Open for snowdrops and hellebores, Feb 14 to March 1, 11am to 4pm, Coton Manor Gardens, Coton. Entry £3 (01604 740219; www.cotonmanor.co.uk).

RHS Wisley Plant, Surrey Hellebore heaven, Feb 14 & 15, 10.30am to 4.30pm, Wisley Plant Centre. Demonstrations at 11am, 1.30pm and 3pm by expert grower Hugh Nunn and Chelsea gold medal winner Richard Bramley. Hellebores on sale. No booking required, free entry (01483 211113; www.rhs.org.uk ).

Broadview Gardens, Kent National collection of hellebores, Feb 15, 21, 22, 28, March 1, Broadview Gardens and Hadlow College, tours at 11am and 2pm, flowers on sale at Broadview Garden Centre. Entry £3 (0500 551434; www.hadlow.ac.uk).

Renishaw Hall, Derbyshire Fanfare for spring, Feb 22, 11am to 3pm, Renishaw Hall, near Sheffield. Gardens and woodlands full of hellebores, snowdrops, bulbs and more. Specialist nurseries, refreshments. Entry £3 (01246 432310; www.renishaw-hall.co.uk).

Coolings, Kent Hellebore weekend, today, 9am-5pm, tomorrow 10am-4.30pm, Coolings Garden Centre, Rushmore Hill. Hellebore display and sale. Free (01959 532269;www.coolings.co.uk).

National Collection, Staffordshire National collection of species hellebores, open Saturdays in Feb/March, 10am-2pm, Hazles Cross Farm, Kingsley. Entry £2, plants for sale (01538 752669;www.nccpg.com).

webcuts This website with links to specialist nurseries and growers will keep you up to date on the latest star plants: www.hellebores.org

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